The Case of Dorothy K. Funn

CAST:
ANNOUNCER
RICHARD ENGLISH, narrator-moderator
DOROTHY, the fictional Dorothy K. Funn
ERIC, Communist student
MADGE, Eric's Communist mother
FATHER, Eric's Communist father
JACK, student
VIRGINIA, student
BOB, student
MR. AHRAM, Communist teacher
FUNN, the real Dorothy K. Funn


MUSIC: APOCALYPTIC THEME FOR INTRODUCTION, THEN WARMLY PATRIOTIC IN BG

ANNOUNCER: The National Broadcasting Company presents _Last Man Out_, a series 
of true stories, transcribed and documented from the official files of United 
States government agencies. 

MUSIC: MILDLY APOCALYPTIC THEME FOR BRIDGE, THEN OUT

FATHER: All right, Eric. Let me hear you recite the verse you memorized.

ERIC: Shall I stand up, Papa?

FATHER: Yes, Eric, er, stand up.

SOUND: ERIC RISES NOISILY FROM CHAIR

FATHER: Go ahead.

ERIC: (CLEARS HIS THROAT) "To free the masses from oppression / To free the 
spirit from its chains / The red flag waves, the red star shines / 
Capitalism's down, the worker reigns ..." (BREAKS OFF) What are capitalists, 
Papa?

FATHER: (CRISPLY) Capitalists, Eric, are what _we_ are _not_.

MUSIC: APOCALYPTIC THEME FOR BRIDGE, THEN MERELY OMINOUS IN BG, OUT AT [X]

ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, here is your narrator for _Last Man Out_, the 
well-known writer Mr. Richard English. 

ENGLISH: Thank you. Tonight, ladies and gentlemen, you are going to hear one 
of the most important programs in this entire _Last Man Out_ series. There's 
been a lot of criticism lately directed at government committees which have 
attempted to expose the Communist infiltration of our American schools. 
Tonight, we're going to prove that that Communist infiltration _did_ happen 
here. Our subject tonight is Dorothy K. Funn, a New York City school teacher. 
Miss Funn joined the Communist Party in 1939, left it in 1946. [X] Her story's 
not what you'd call a cloak-and-dagger tale. It happens to be far more 
important and far deadlier than that. Dorothy Funn actually saw the poison 
that was being injected into our school systems -- the attempt to mold the 
minds of our children into the Communist pattern. Now, the subject report of 
former Communist Party member, Dorothy K. Funn. 

MUSIC: APOCALYPTIC THEME FOR BRIDGE, THEN MERELY OMINOUS IN BG, OUT AT [X]

DOROTHY: I joined the Communist Party in May of 1939. I was recruited by 
another teacher with whom I'd become friendly. 

ENGLISH: About a month and a half after the subject was taken into the Party, 
she was sent to a state communist training school for teachers on a farm in 
upstate New York. It was a six weeks' course. [X] Among other things, the 
subject was taught how to indoctrinate the schoolchildren in the ways and 
thinking of Communist Party principles. She was taught how to slant everyday 
problems in such a manner that they always favored the thinking of the Soviet 
Union. 

DOROTHY: While we were at this school, we weren't allowed to receive mail, or 
to send it. And we were to remain on the grounds of the school at all times. 
One night during our six weeks' training period, we _were_ allowed to go into 
town to a movie. But we all went as a group and loaded on a truck. (AMUSED) 
I'll never forget the ride back to the school; it was a bumpy one.

SOUND: TRUCK ENGINE ... LAUGHTER AND CONVERSATION ... IN BG

DOROTHY: Well, Madge, two more weeks and we'll be back in the big city.

MADGE: I'm really anxious, Dorothy. I haven't seen my little boy for over a 
month. He probably won't even recognize me.

DOROTHY: Well, how old is he, Madge?

MADGE: Six and a half, going on seven. 

DOROTHY: Hm.

MADGE: Smart one, too. You'd be surprised how progressive he is. And I _mean_ 
progressive.

DOROTHY: That's good. Your husband in the Party?

MADGE: Oh, sure. Very active, too. That's why I know our little boy is going 
to grow up to be a big man in the Party someday. 

DOROTHY: Good.

MADGE: You know, it's the _early_ training that counts. And we're giving him 
plenty of that. He knows half the nursery rhymes in the Young Pioneer by 
heart. And he's only six and a half, going on seven. 

DOROTHY: Hm.

MADGE: His favorite is the one that goes: "Eeny, meeny, miney, mo / Workers 
robbed where'er they go / They can stop it if they're not too slow / We young 
comrades tell them so."

DOROTHY: (APPRECIATIVE) Oh, I remember that one! It was one of the very first  
ones _I_ ever memorized! Well, your young son sounds like he'll make a 
brilliant student. What's his name?

MADGE: Eric. 

DOROTHY: Eric. Hm. That's a good name.

MUSIC: APOCALYPTIC BRIDGE ... THEN OUT

ENGLISH: Subject got back to New York just in time to start teaching the fall 
semester at one of the public schools. This was in 1939. There were 
approximately forty thousand teachers in New York City at that time. How many 
were Communist?

DOROTHY: Oh, about a thousand.

ENGLISH: What were some of the ways in which a Communist teacher was able to 
influence her students along party line thinking and principles?

DOROTHY: Well, there were various ways. Where possible, a teacher slanted 
history lessons. Slanted everyday problems, too.

SOUND: CLASSROOM NOISE

DOROTHY: All right, students! Students? We'll do our oral reports now! 
Students? 

SOUND: CLASSROOM NOISE SUBSIDES

DOROTHY: We'll do our oral reports now on world events. First one, Jack 
Glazer. Please stand and make your report, Jack.

SOUND: CHAIR SCRAPES, JACK RISES

DOROTHY: Now, give us the title, and then a one minute summary.

JACK: Well, my report is called "Germany Marches on Poland." By yesterday, the 
German army marched into Poland and started a war with the people of Poland. 

DOROTHY: (INTERRUPTS, SLYLY) Uh, Jack? Do you know why?

JACK: 'Cause they want more land?

DOROTHY: (SORROWFUL) Oh, no. No, that's not the _real_ reason. The real reason 
is the Soviet Union. They want to invade the _peaceful_ Soviet Union. 

JACK: Oh?

DOROTHY: Yes, it's very easy to see _why_ they want to invade the Soviet 
Union. Russia is a - _real_ democracy. In a sense, more of a democracy than we 
are.

ENGLISH: See how simple it is? First, you start twisting our kids' thoughts.

DOROTHY: Now, let's just look at history. Mr. Lincoln fought a civil war to 
free the Negroes. And there's still Jim Crowism in this country. In Russia, 
it's different. In Russia, the Negro is his own master. Well, that's what I 
meant when I said, in a sense, Russia's more of a democratic nation than 
America is.

JACK: Oh, then we're all really for Russia in this war? 'Cause Russia's 
defending democracy. Is that right, Mrs. Funn?

DOROTHY: (SLYLY) Mmmmm ... yes. Yes, you might put it that way. But there's 
more to it than that. 

JACK: What do you mean, Mrs. Funn?

ENGLISH: Now the Communist Party line really comes out.

DOROTHY: Well, Germany is a totalitarian state -- a dictatorship, a type of 
tyranny. A nation of persecution and hate and prejudice. While, on the other 
hand, Russia's exactly the opposite. Now, we definitely find some persecution, 
some hate, and some prejudice in this country. How do we eliminate it? First, 
by destroying the big enemy; that would be Germany. And then the time will 
come for us to clean out our own backyard. Do you see what I mean? 

JACK: I sure do, Mrs. Funn.

DOROTHY: Fine! And, Jack, for giving us that splendid oral report, I'm going 
to give you an "A."

MUSIC: APOCALYPTIC THEME FOR BRIDGE, THEN MERELY OMINOUS IN BG, OUT AT [X]

ENGLISH: How were the party line policies that you were to push forward in 
your classes in the schoolrooms handed down to you, Dorothy?

DOROTHY: Well, we attended section meetings every two weeks, at which time we 
were given specific orders about what party line policies were to be pushed in 
the classrooms.

ENGLISH: Slanting history as it happened was one method of pushing Communist 
influence. Were there other methods?

DOROTHY: Oh, yes! Yes, America's past history was also slanted. And then 
another method was the slanting of ordinary discussion groups. [X] Sometimes 
we'd have the students discuss questions, pro and con, and we, the teachers, 
would act as moderators.

SOUND: CLASSROOM NOISE

DOROTHY: All right, students! All right! All right, students, let me have your 
attention, please.

SOUND: CLASSROOM NOISE SUBSIDES

DOROTHY: Today, our panel discussion will be on the Civil War. Virginia, you 
may begin the discussion. It might be a good idea to state first the reasons 
why the Civil War began.

VIRGINIA: It began over slavery in the South. President Abraham Lincoln wanted 
to free the slave in the South and--

DOROTHY: (INTERRUPTS) I - I think it might be a good idea for me to inject a 
thought at this point. (SLYLY) Did any of you students know that the South 
does not recognize President Abraham Lincoln's birthday as a holiday?

BOB: Why's that, Mrs. Funn?

DOROTHY: Well, Bob, even though a war was fought to free the slaves, there's 
still a great deal of slavery going on in the South. For example, the textile 
workers in the factories.

BOB: I don't know about them but my folks said that a lot of the Negroes 
remain in the South because they were treated very well by their employers. 
They even said that some of the Negro women practically raise the children of 
the white folks. That's how much they were respected and loved.

DOROTHY: (SORROWFUL) Well, your folks are very wrong, Bob. That's what they 
call ... propaganda.

SOUND: DOOR OPENS

DOROTHY: Oh, just a moment, boys and girls. 

SOUND: DOOR CLOSES, FOOTSTEPS IN

DOROTHY: Yes?

ERIC: Are you Mrs. Funn?

DOROTHY: Yes.

ERIC: My name is Eric Norton, Mrs. Funn. I'm a new boy. We just moved to this 
district and I transferred over from P.S. Forty-five.

DOROTHY: All right, Eric. Have you been to the principal's office?

ERIC: Yes'm.

DOROTHY: Uh, students, I'd like to have you meet a new member of your class, 
Eric Norton.

STUDENTS: Hi! Hello!

DOROTHY: All right, Eric, you may sit down.

SOUND: ERIC'S FOOTSTEPS

DOROTHY: (REALIZES) Oh! Eric? 

ERIC: Yes'm?

DOROTHY: Is your mother a schoolteacher?

ERIC: Yes'm. She teaches over in the Queens district. 

DOROTHY: Is her first name Madge?

ERIC: That's right, Mrs. Funn. Madge.

DOROTHY: (UNDERSTATED) I'm glad to have you with us, Eric. I think you're 
going to like this class - very much, Eric. Very much.

MUSIC: OMINOUS PIANO BRIDGE, THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

ENGLISH: The subject continued teaching and continued attending the party 
discussion group meetings every two weeks. How were these groups organized?

DOROTHY: Well, everyone in the group was a teacher from some public school. We 
had a chairman, a treasurer, and an educational director.

ENGLISH: Let me ask you this. Were schoolchildren ever used in Communist 
demonstrations?

DOROTHY: Oh, yes. [X] Yes, but usually they were children whose parents were 
already sympathizers or party members. The May Day parade was one of the best 
places to employ children for - for the "family effects" on those watching the 
parade. I marched in my first May Day parade in 1940.

SOUND: PARADE AND CROWD NOISE, CONTINUES IN BG THROUGHOUT SCENE 

AHRAM: Mrs. Funn?

DOROTHY: Well, yes, Mr. Ahram?

AHRAM: Are all the children here?

DOROTHY: Well, no, there's one missing. Eric Norton. He should be here any 
moment.

AHRAM: We won't be able to wait much longer. The parade's about to start.

DOROTHY: Well, he promised me he'd be here. He's very enthusiastic about the 
whole thing, Mr. Ahram. Well, you know Eric, don't you?

AHRAM: Yes, I know him. (TO THE CROWD) All right, students! Don't move out of 
line! And hold those banners up straight when you march! Make sure they can be 
read! And now, remember where you're to march -- next to the older people! 
Form a single line on either side and march next to them!

CHILDREN: Yes, sir! Okay, Mr. Ahram!

AHRAM: Mrs. Funn, we can't wait much longer for that Norton boy.

SOUND: WHISTLE

STUDENTS: There's the whistle!

AHRAM: Well, there it goes. (TO THE CROWD) All right, students! March out in 
the street and take your places! Single file!

SOUND: ERIC'S FOOTSTEPS RUNNING

ERIC: (APPROACHING) Mrs. Funn! Mrs. Funn!

DOROTHY: Oh, there you are, Eric! I was so afraid you were going to miss-- 
Why, hello, Madge!

MADGE: Hello, Dorothy! Nice to see you again.

DOROTHY: It's been a long time. We'd better hurry; the parade's just about 
ready to start. We'll talk later, Madge. Do you have your placard, Eric?

ERIC: Uh huh, right here.

DOROTHY: All right! Hold it high! And remember we want everybody to be able to 
see it and to read it!

MUSIC: SNARE DRUMS FOR MARCHING ... WITH OMINOUS TYMPANI

AHRAM: (IN CADENCE) Hup, two, three, four! Hup, two, three, four! March in 
unison! That's it! Keep in step! Hup, hup! March, toil, reap, mine! Others 
wear garments fine! March, toil, reap, mine! Others wear garments fine!

STUDENTS: (OVERLAPS, JOINING IN) March, toil, reap, mine! Others wear garments 
fine!

MUSIC: BUILDS TO AN OMINOUS CLIMAX, TOPPING THE CROWD, THEN OUT

DOROTHY: Although we harped on discrimination and prejudice as one thing that 
Communism would do away with-- (SIGHS) Yet we - we practiced certain 
discriminations right there in the public schools. We discriminated against 
students and - also teachers who were not favorable to the movement.

AHRAM: Mrs. Funn, have you met Mrs. Goodman, the new history teacher?

DOROTHY: Mmm, I met her at lunch in the cafeteria yesterday; seems like a nice 
person.

AHRAM: She's not.

DOROTHY: What do you mean?

AHRAM: She hasn't got one progressive idea in her stupid head. She's what I 
call a total loss. 

DOROTHY: Oh, I see.

AHRAM: She might be dangerous. We'll have to keep a close watch on her. She's 
the kind that runs and talks. 

DOROTHY: Hmmm.

AHRAM: I didn't say much to her. I - I just listened. 

DOROTHY: What about her family?

AHRAM: Ohhh, conservative stock. I think I'll give a little party and - ask 
everyone but her. 

DOROTHY: Mm hm, mm hm, I see.

AHRAM: I'll, uh, also think of some other ways to, uh, isolate her. We've 
definitely got to make her feel she's not wanted around here. Maybe she'll ask 
for a transfer.

DOROTHY: Well, that's probably the best way to handle it.

AHRAM: You see, we've got this school pretty well organized right now. I hate 
to have anyone come along and mess up all the good we've done. We've got to 
get rid of her as soon as possible. I know a liberal sub I'd like to see take 
her place. I'll see what kind of strings I can pull to, uh, get her in over 
here.

DOROTHY: Mm.

AHRAM: But, in the meantime, Mrs. Funn, pass the word along to the others. Our 
objective? Get rid of Mrs. Goodman.

MUSIC: SLEDGEHAMMER ACCENT ... THEN NEUTRAL, IN BG, OUT AT [X]

ENGLISH: It wasn't long before Mrs. Goodman was out. The subject continued 
teaching until 1943 when she resigned from the school system, went to work as 
an administrative secretary for a minorities-labor victory committee; then as 
a legislative representative for the National Minorities Congress; and, later 
still, as a representative for the New York State Political Action Committee 
in Washington, D. C. In 1946, the subject, who had slowly been growing fed up, 
left the Communist Party.  

DOROTHY: I left Washington and returned to New York and applied for another 
teaching position with the New York City school systems. [X]

ENGLISH: The subject was reinstated, resumed her teaching job the early part 
of 1947. When the House Committee on Un-American Activities began its 
investigation of Communist infiltration into the school systems, the subject 
testified before them, naming names and giving any and all information she had 
of the Communist Party and its working in our schools. 

SOUND: HUAC HEARING CROWD ... GAVEL BANGS ... CROWD SUBSIDES DURING FOLLOWING

CHAIRMAN: The committee will come to order! Proceed, Mr. Counsel.

COUNSEL: Uh, Mrs. Funn, you have been a member, or had been a member, for 
quite some time, of the Communist Party here in the city of New York. There 
was quite an audience in this room this morning and there is quite an audience 
here this afternoon. Is it correct, you recognize quite a number of the people 
in the audience as former members of the Communist Party when you were?

DOROTHY: Yes.

CROWD: SOME BOO AND HOLLER

COUNSEL: They are here today in this audience?

DOROTHY: Yes.

CROWD: SOME BOO AND HOLLER AGAIN

COUNSEL: I'm not sure whether you have ever read that provision, have you, 
under which this committee operates?

DOROTHY: No, I have not.

COUNSEL: This law says-- Er, may I read?

DOROTHY: Yes.

COUNSEL: The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by 
subcommittee, is authorized to make investigations of the extent, the 
character, the objectives of un-American propaganda activities in the United 
States. And the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-
American propaganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic 
origin and attacks the principle of government as guaranteed by our 
Constitution. 

CROWD: SOME SKEPTICAL CHUCKLING AND RUMBLING 

COUNSEL: Now, did you hear any question or observe any act by this committee 
which, in your judgment, was a trespass upon your civil rights in any way, or 
your rights as an American citizen?

DOROTHY: Well, no. You've shown only one thing; that you're interested in 
getting at the facts.

CROWD: SOME DERISIVE LAUGHTER

DOROTHY: You're interested in helping to eliminate the causes which have made 
this subversive activity possible. I don't think in any instant you've 
infringed upon my rights as a citizen. I've been very happy to come here and - 
and give any assistance I've given.

COUNSEL: Mrs. Funn, speaking for myself, I say you have been a most 
informative witness. I am sure the information you have given to this 
committee will be most valuable. You have added a great deal to the 
information that the committee has already assembled. Now, unless there is 
something further, Mr. Chairman--?

CHAIRMAN: Nothing further. The committee will stand in recess until ten 
o'clock tomorrow morning. 

SOUND: GAVEL BANGS ONCE ... CROWD MURMURS

MUSIC: APOCALYPTIC ACCENT ... THEN SYMPATHETIC, IN BG

ENGLISH: Dorothy Funn still has a tremendous feeling for the rights of the 
minorities. That was one of the reasons she joined the Communist Party. But 
she realized in time that the Communist Party wasn't the answer to what she 
wanted. She realized that the Party used the problems of the minority to 
spread its own gospel. And when she found that out, she quit the party. She 
has resumed her teaching career, however, and it wasn't an easy road back. At 
times, it was lonesome. But she made it. And Dorothy Funn is another good 
example that an ex-Communist _can_ come back. 

MUSIC: NOBLE, TRIUMPHANT ... THEN OUT

ENGLISH: And, now, the moment we've all been waiting for, when we'll ask 
tonight's subject some of the questions that all America has wanted to ask. 
What is being done now, Dorothy, to rid the school systems of Communists, and 
Communist teachers and Communist training? What's being done here in New York, 
for example?

FUNN: Well, here in New York, uh, a very fine program has been initiated by 
Doctor Jansen in weeding out Communist schoolteachers in the New York City 
school system. And he has received the help of - of, uh, a council here in New 
York who carries on these, uh, investigations. 

ENGLISH: Uh, would you say that this investigation has been fairly successful?

FUNN: I would you say that it has been _very_ successful.

ENGLISH: Did you ever have any reaction from parents when it was learned you 
had been a Communist schoolteacher?

FUNN: No direct reaction.  

ENGLISH: I see.

FUNN: I, uh-- No.

ENGLISH: It wasn't known until four years after you broke the Party that you 
had ever been a Communist. Is that correct?

FUNN: I would say yes and no. Uh, it wasn't _openly_ known but I think that 
many people by that time had considered me a member of the Communist Party.

ENGLISH: Well, how - how did, uh, was your life affected when you broke with 
the Party? Was it like being in a vacuum--?

FUNN: It was very much so. I was, er, sort of "on the moon," alone for a while 
since I had, uh - uh, severed all connections with my former friends and many 
of my relatives in going into this, uh, uh, Communist Party activity, so that 
upon my return-- And, of course, uh, I was no longer welcome with, uh, those 
who still were members of the Communist Party with whom I also did not wish to 
associate. 

ENGLISH: I see. All right. Tell me now, what were the Communist Party 
instructions regarding teachers' relations with members of the P.T.A.?

FUNN: Their instructions were to, uh-- For each teacher, to make it, er, a 
"must" to attend the Parent Teacher Association meetings and to guide, er, uh, 
the actions and policies of that organization. Further, wherever possible, 
they were to, uh, become particularly friendly and close to those members of 
the P.T.A. who looked like "good material," uh, for outside work on, uh, the 
political scene, I might say.

ENGLISH: Yes.

FUNN: Looking, of course, toward the last thing, of, uh, recruiting them into 
the Communist Party--

ENGLISH: Thank you very much.

MUSIC: APOCALYPTIC THEME FOR A FINISH, THEN OUT

ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. English will be back in just a moment. 
For security reasons, certain names in the subject report of Dorothy Funn were 
changed. Each week, _Last Man Out_ will expose a different phase of Communism. 
Next week's subject report will be that of a subject who served the Communist 
state behind the Iron Curtain. Now, once again, Mr. English.

ENGLISH: Tonight, I want to speak to the ex-Communists who are listening. I 
know how tough it is to be on the outside looking in. For seventeen years, I 
was deaf. It's only eight years ago I had my hearing restored in one ear. So I 
know what it's like to come back. And that's what you want to do. If you've 
been afraid that your boss and friends might find out that you're an ex-
Communist and wouldn't understand what took you in and what took you out of 
the Party, why don't you write me? Maybe I can help. Just write "Dick English,  
care of NBC, Hollywood, California" and mark it personal. Good night.

MUSIC: APOCALYPTIC THEME ... THEN WARMLY PATRIOTIC, IN BG

ANNOUNCER: Next week, Richard English will bring to our microphones the true 
story of another former member of the Communist Party, documented and 
transcribed from the official files of United States government agencies. 
_Last Man Out_ is an NBC Radio Network production by Richard English. Directed 
by Andrew C. Love and written by Richard George Pedicini. Our musical score is 
composed and conducted by Dimitri Tiomkin, Academy Award Winner. 

MUSIC: GRAND, TRIUMPHANT ... OUT

ANNOUNCER: December is the month of the joyous holiday season. It's also the 
month of the highest number of motor vehicle accidents. Take a safe driving 
tip from the truck drivers who are taught to drive "ahead" of themselves. Take 
extra care on the highways during the holiday season. Use courtesy, caution, 
and common sense. This is the NBC Radio Network. 

SOUND: NBC CHIMES

________________________________
Originally broadcast: 6 December 1953





NOTES:

1. From Time Magazine, October 19, 1953:

	Last Man Out (Sun. 10 p.m.) is the brain child of 
	Richard English, an ex-prizefighter turned highly 
	successful magazine writer, who wants to get the 
	last man out of the Communist PartyŚ"the man 
	America needs most." As English explained on his 
	first program: "When a drunk quits, he can go to 
	Alcoholics Anonymous; when a Commie gets out, he 
	has no place to go. Maybe this program can do 
	something about that." By interviews and 
	dramatizations, the experiences of ex-Communists 
	are recounted in a quietly believable, non-
	melodramatic way. English has signed up a long 
	list of ex-Reds, including Elizabeth Bentley and 
	Movie Director Edward Dmytryk (one of the 
	"Hollywood Ten" who quit the party in 1951). He 
	has high hopes for the show: "I want the sleeper, 
	the guy who will quit. He's my man. I'm trying to 
	show him his mistake and make him get out before 
	it's too late . . ."

A syndicated newspaper column from April '54 mentions that the series was 
canceled after twenty-six weeks because it couldn't attract a sponsor. 

2. The episode claims that Funn worked for the "National Minorities Congress" 
and "a minorities-labor victory committee." In fact, she testified before the 
House Committee on Un-American Activities that she worked for the National 
Negro Congress and the Negro Labor Victory Committee. For whatever reason, the 
episode obscures the fact that Funn was African-American.

Author Martha Biondi describes Funn's 1953 HUAC testimony in _To Stand and 
Fight: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Postwar New York City_ (Harvard 
University Press, 2006):

	Funn provided a picture of an insincere Communist 
	Party and a self-portrait of a sincere Communist 
	motivated by noble goals. After stating that "we 
	were really a puppet of the Communist party, and 
	that there was truly no interest in furthering 
	Negro rights," she testified that Communist 
	lobbyists in Washington, including herself, worked 
	strenuously for passage of FEPC, [Fair Employment 
	Practices Committee] as well as anti-poll tax and 
	antilynching bills. In a move that southern anti-
	communists would try frequently in the coming 
	decade, a committee member tried to get her to 
	call those bills Communist inspired, but she threw
	the question back on the committee, urging HUAC to 
	pass an FEPC bill as a true example of its 
	Americanism. Despite Funn's cooperation with HUAC, 
	she did not share its hostility to racial equality.